• Common Core State Standards, Factors Influencing Student Achievement, Responsive Coaching, Teacher Evaluation, Autism

  • JP partners with schools and districts across the country to provide intensive professional development for scientifically-based programs.

  • JP Associates offers our sites grant writing assistance. Take advantage of our experience writing successful grant requests.

  • JP works with schools providing training on how to ameliorate teacher weaknesses brought to light through the process of teacher evaluation.

  • JP brings together several critical factors in the development of an effective school.
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What Pre-K Means for Your Pre-Teenager

Just how important is good preschool in the course of a child’s life?

Skeptical researchers have contended that it doesn’t really matter, that preschool provides only short-term educational assistance that fades out after a few years. But new findings from a continuing study of 4,000 children in Tulsa, Okla., should put that contention to rest. High-quality prekindergarten has powerful long-term cognitive effects.

The researchers, based at Georgetown University, began tracking these children in 2006 and followed them through the eighth grade. As eighth graders, they were less likely to be held back than their classmates who did not attend preschool, and their scores on the state’s math achievement test were higher. They were also more likely to take algebra in the eighth grade — a consistent predictor of college readiness.

It’s not just that the Tulsa preschoolers were ahead of their peers academically when they got to kindergarten. While the gap in math achievement narrowed over time, the students who had gone to prekindergarten still maintained an academic advantage in middle school. When the researchers used the Tulsa data to project the impact of the program into adulthood, they concluded that because of those youngsters’ higher projected income and diminished likelihood of incarceration, every dollar invested in quality preschool could generate a two-dollar return.

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5 Principles of Outstanding Classroom Management

A teacher engages his students in a math lesson.

When we asked our community for their best classroom management practices, over 700 ideas rolled in.

Effective classroom management requires awareness, patience, good timing, boundaries, and instinct. There’s nothing easy about shepherding a large group of easily distractible young people with different skills and temperaments along a meaningful learning journey.

So how do master teachers do it?

To get a deeper understanding of experienced teachers’ go-to classroom management strategies, we took an informal poll on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. Unsurprisingly, there is no silver bullet for classroom management success. That said, as we pored over the more than 700 responses, we did see some clear trends. Here are the most often cited and creative approaches.

1. Take Care of Yourself to Take Care of Your Students

As the airline safety videos say: Put on your own oxygen mask first.

To learn effectively, your students need a healthy you, said our experienced teachers. So get enough sleep, eat healthy food, and take steps to attend to your own well-being. In her first year of teaching, Jessica Sachs “was working 15-hour days and was completely stressed out. My husband finally said to me, ‘The most important thing that you do at school is make decisions. If you are too tired to do that properly, it won’t matter how well-prepared you were the night before.’” A few deep breaths can go a long way to helping you identify frustration before you act on it. Mindy Jones, a middle school teacher from Brownsville, Tennessee, notes that “a moment of patience in a moment of frustration saves you a hundred moments of regret.”

Countless studies corroborate the idea that self-care reduces stress, which can deplete your energy and impair your judgment. While self-care is more of a habit or practice for your own well-being than an actual classroom management strategy, the benefits include improved executive function, greater empathy, and increased resilience—all qualities that will empower you to make better decisionswhen confronted with challenging classroom situations.

2. Focus on Building Relationships

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7 ways to effectively address challenging behaviors in children with autism

children with autism

After appropriately identifying the behavior in a child with autism, a suitable intervention can be used to proactively, or reactively, reduce and replace it.

Challenging behaviors can be difficult to address in children with autism. After appropriately identifying the behavior, a suitable intervention can be used to proactively, or reactively, reduce and replace it. Experts reviewed key points and effective ways to address these problem behaviors in the edWebinar, “Effective Approaches to Reduce and Replace Challenging Behaviors Exhibited by Children with Autism.”

1. Define the behavior in a non-subjective manner: In order to address a behavioral problem, the behavior must first be defined. The behavior should be specific, observable, and measurable, and it should not be subjective.

2. Have a data baseline: It’s crucial to have a baseline to tell if the intervention is working, and how well. Therefore, data collection is key when putting an intervention into place. Different methods of data collection can be used depending on the circumstance or how you plan to measure the behavior that’s occurring.

3. Implement proactive strategies: After identifying the behavior and collecting the data, what can be done to reduce or replace it? Proactive strategies may include a classroom checklist to make sure the environment is optimal for learning; the student has an effective way to communicate; there are enough opportunities for movement (depending on the age of the student); and more.

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Principals list 6 school technology priorities moving into 2018

principals school technology

A new report reveals how school principals manage tech initiatives and purchasing.

Although 90 percent of principals said they believe technology is critical for student learning, only two-thirds would rate their school technology as strong, according to a new report from MDR EdNET Insight.

The report, “School Trends: Principals’ Perspectives on Instructional Initiatives and Purchasing Decisions,” includes data broken down by school level, size, location, and Title I status.

In combination with the research from the entire four-part series, the report offers a 360-degree view of decision-making authority at all levels, from an administrator, to a principal to a classroom teacher.

Based on a national survey, U.S. principals shared their priorities on:
• Instructional initiatives–implementation of innovative practices, such as personalized learning
• Purchasing–where, how, and by whom decisions are made on various types of purchases with discretionary school budgets
• Professional development needs for teachers and themselves
• Resources–how they learn about new products and view marketing and sales approaches
• Leadership issues–overall vision to improve student outcomes while facing many challenges

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Student Challenge | Connect What You’re Studying in School With the World Today

 

So you’re studying the Civil War — or Shakespeare, or evolution, or “The Bluest Eye.”

Why? What does it have to do with your life and the lives of those around you? Why should you remember it once you’ve turned in that paper or taken that test?

What relevance does it have today? What lessons can you learn from it that can be applied to the world outside of school? What parallels do you see between it and something happening in our culture or the news?

Although your teachers probably pose questions like these already, this challenge invites you to answer them a little more formally.

Essentially, we’re asking you to do what we do every day: connect what’s in The New York Times with what you’re learning in school.

If you simply open NYTimes.com and start clicking around, you’ll see that the task is not that hard. The Times publishes hundreds of articles from around the globe every day, so you can almost always find something that confronts the very same themes, questions or issues that you’ve been discussing in class.

But to help, we have a lesson plan with a few practical suggestions, including one on how to search for useful Times content.

Good luck, and, as always, please post questions in the comments and we’ll answer you there. We’re excited to see what you come up with!

Rules and Tips

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  • Detailed Needs Assessment
  • Customized Professional Development
  • Grant-writing
  • Strategies for serving students with Autism
  • Creating a positive school/classroom culture
  • Leadership training and coaching
  • Common Core State Standards
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  • Effective Reading Instruction
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